2018 Dodge Durango in Depth: The Muscle Car of Crossovers

2017-Dodge-Durango-01-placement

Dodge, the bad-boy brand of Fiat Chrysler, is home to some of the most tire-roasting, sideways-driving muscle cars in the automotive kingdom. An SUV with seating for up to seven doesn’t sound as if it would fit into that lineup, but the Durango easily earns its place alongside the Charger sedan and the Challenger coupe with an available Hemi V-8 and standard rear-wheel drive. Sure, there are more practical crossovers available, and more fuel-efficient ones, too, but the trade-offs are small. The Durango’s towing capacity easily bests its rivals in this class, and sitting atop its contoured dashboard is the most intuitive infotainment system around. A rear-seat entertainment system is also available to keep the kiddos entertained while you bomb the back roads. When it comes to SUVs, the Durango offers the most swagger and charm in this humdrum segment, and that’s why we’ve named it to our Editors’ Choice list multiple times. READ MORE ››

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/ykdh50aD-pE/2018-dodge-durango-in-depth-model-review

2018 Dodge Durango in Depth: The Muscle Car of Crossovers

2018 Dodge Durango in Depth: The Muscle Car of Crossovers

2017-Dodge-Durango-01-placement

Dodge, the bad-boy brand of Fiat Chrysler, is home to some of the most tire-roasting, sideways-driving muscle cars in the automotive kingdom. An SUV with seating for up to seven doesn’t sound as if it would fit into that lineup, but the Durango easily earns its place alongside the Charger sedan and the Challenger coupe with an available Hemi V-8 and standard rear-wheel drive. Sure, there are more practical crossovers available, and more fuel-efficient ones, too, but the trade-offs are small. The Durango’s towing capacity easily bests its rivals in this class, and sitting atop its contoured dashboard is the most intuitive infotainment system around. A rear-seat entertainment system is also available to keep the kiddos entertained while you bomb the back roads. When it comes to SUVs, the Durango offers the most swagger and charm in this humdrum segment, and that’s why we’ve named it to our Editors’ Choice list multiple times. READ MORE ››

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/ykdh50aD-pE/2018-dodge-durango-in-depth-model-review

2018 Dodge Durango in Depth: The Muscle Car of Crossovers

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Update: 20K Miles and Still Trouble-Free

WHAT WE LIKE: While the latest Chrysler Pacifica minivan is practical, functional, and fuel efficient—and even resists stereotypes by being dynamically sound and aesthetically pleasing—the topic of most interest among potential buyers seems to be reliability. Swiftly reaching the halfway point of our 40,000-mile test, our Pacifica is perpetually active, in demand for trips near and far, and skillful both at hauling cargo both sentient and otherwise. It’s also adept at switching between those transporting extremes with its fold-into-the-floor seats. Thus far, it’s been completely reliable, too, pausing only for routine service at 10,000 and 20,000 miles. The only issues, which we’ve already mentioned in previous updates, have been inconsequential: A plastic clip broke the first time we removed the panel that conceals the spare tire, and sometimes during a remote start the climate-control temperature setting annoyingly defaults to its coldest setting, which certainly works against attempts to prewarm the cabin. READ MORE ››

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/_fi9gzhwkbA/2017-chrysler-pacifica-long-term-test-update-review

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Update: 20K Miles and Still Trouble-Free

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Update: 20K Miles and Still Trouble-Free

WHAT WE LIKE: While the latest Chrysler Pacifica minivan is practical, functional, and fuel efficient—and even resists stereotypes by being dynamically sound and aesthetically pleasing—the topic of most interest among potential buyers seems to be reliability. Swiftly reaching the halfway point of our 40,000-mile test, our Pacifica is perpetually active, in demand for trips near and far, and skillful both at hauling cargo both sentient and otherwise. It’s also adept at switching between those transporting extremes with its fold-into-the-floor seats. Thus far, it’s been completely reliable, too, pausing only for routine service at 10,000 and 20,000 miles. The only issues, which we’ve already mentioned in previous updates, have been inconsequential: A plastic clip broke the first time we removed the panel that conceals the spare tire, and sometimes during a remote start the climate-control temperature setting annoyingly defaults to its coldest setting, which certainly works against attempts to prewarm the cabin. READ MORE ››

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/_fi9gzhwkbA/2017-chrysler-pacifica-long-term-test-update-review

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Long-Term Update: 20K Miles and Still Trouble-Free

Gordon Murray Tells Why the McLaren F1 Had a Center Driver’s Seat, and Other Secrets of the Supercar’s Design [Video]

screen-shot-2017-08-16-at-11-56-44-am-1502899028

The legendary McLaren F1 turns 25 years old in 2017, and to celebrate the occasion, the company put together a neat little video featuring the car’s lead designer, Gordon Murray. He goes into detail about how the team behind the car used a racing mentality to break records and steal the hearts of enthusiasts everywhere.

In the four-minute clip, Murray explains that many of the “new” road-car technologies used in the F1 were borrowed from the state of the art in Formula 1 racing at the time. He points out, for example, that the main reason for the car’s iconic center driver’s seat wasn’t to make the driver feel special (although that was certainly a part of it). In truth, it eliminates the offset pedal box that forced so many drivers of other supercars to sit slightly crooked in the car.

Murray also points out that the F1 uses ram intake pressure to force air into the engine, just like on a Formula 1 car. This pressure was what allowed the car to hit the rev limiter on its top-speed attempt, forcing the team to remove the limiter and eventually achieve that fabled 242-mph run.



But that’s just a couple of the neat facts Murray mentions here. Watch for yourself to learn the rest.

The story originally appeared on Road & Track.

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/bDwEWv4HrOk/

Gordon Murray Tells Why the McLaren F1 Had a Center Driver’s Seat, and Other Secrets of the Supercar’s Design [Video]

Gordon Murray Tells Why the McLaren F1 Had a Center Driver’s Seat, and Other Secrets of the Supercar’s Design [Video]

screen-shot-2017-08-16-at-11-56-44-am-1502899028

The legendary McLaren F1 turns 25 years old in 2017, and to celebrate the occasion, the company put together a neat little video featuring the car’s lead designer, Gordon Murray. He goes into detail about how the team behind the car used a racing mentality to break records and steal the hearts of enthusiasts everywhere.

In the four-minute clip, Murray explains that many of the “new” road-car technologies used in the F1 were borrowed from the state of the art in Formula 1 racing at the time. He points out, for example, that the main reason for the car’s iconic center driver’s seat wasn’t to make the driver feel special (although that was certainly a part of it). In truth, it eliminates the offset pedal box that forced so many drivers of other supercars to sit slightly crooked in the car.

Murray also points out that the F1 uses ram intake pressure to force air into the engine, just like on a Formula 1 car. This pressure was what allowed the car to hit the rev limiter on its top-speed attempt, forcing the team to remove the limiter and eventually achieve that fabled 242-mph run.



But that’s just a couple of the neat facts Murray mentions here. Watch for yourself to learn the rest.

The story originally appeared on Road & Track.

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/bDwEWv4HrOk/

Gordon Murray Tells Why the McLaren F1 Had a Center Driver’s Seat, and Other Secrets of the Supercar’s Design [Video]

2018 Honda HR-V in Depth: High on Utility, Stingy on Sport

2018-Honda-HR-V-01-Placement01

The small-SUV segment is heating up quickly, and there are a few standout options in the segment—the Kia Soul and the Mazda CX-3 spring to mind—but none of them do cargo hauling better than the Honda HR-V. Its ingenious second-row Magic Seat is borrowed from its corporate cousin, the subcompact Honda Fit hatchback; when folded, the seat creates class-above cargo space. Fuel efficiency is the HR-V’s other strong point, but, unfortunately, driving dynamics aren’t. For a well-built, highly practical pint-sized SUV, look no further. For buyers who value sport more than utility, try the Kia or the Mazda. READ MORE ››

from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/u1NDwsiV6IU/2018-honda-hr-v-in-depth-model-review

2018 Honda HR-V in Depth: High on Utility, Stingy on Sport